Top 10 must visit bali places #agus bali transport & tour service

Many people say that Bali is overrated, too touristy and not worth to visit. I guess it really all depends how you would enjoy Bali. Not only that it has been popular in it’s own right, with post eat, pray, love, is there still the Bali that started it all?

Regardless, as time has passed, and places may have grown, yes Bali is still what it is somewhat but not quite. If you can look past the many tourists especially during peak season and instead of scorning, enjoy instead the many little business dotted around specifically to cater to tourists, you might just fall in love with Bali.

Bali deserves still the attention it is getting, just to list the Top 10 must visit places is enough to see why you should still travel to Bali.


Uluwatu Temple, Pura Luhur @ Bali

Uluwatu Temple – Pura Luhur

Imagine a large rugged limestone cliff with a temple perched on it, almost like a scene from cliffhanger, to add to it’s dramatic grandeur. It is situated in the island commonly known as Bukit Peninsula, where it also include Bali’s few best beaches like Balangan and also has many good surfing spots. The temple is itself a majestic structure, constructed and expanded by many famous safes since in the 11th Century, it perched at the steep cliff of 70 meters above the Indian ocean. If you go even higher grounds nearby, you will be rewarded with breathtaking view of either side and sunsets over Uluwatu temple itself.


Pura Tanah Lot @ Bali

Pura Tanah Lot

Another majestic rock formation that lays as a foundation of a popular pilgrimage temple. It is most popular for its serenity and cultural significance as it is associated with the Balinese mythology as one of the seven temples that form a ring in the southwest of Bali. Try to go there during low tide so that you can experience walking across the water to the temple for the full experience.


Pura Ulun Danu Bratan (Bali’s temple by the lake)

This is the famous temple by the lake in Bali, where instead of like the rest perching on the cliff rock, this one is serenely resting at the edge of Lake Bratan. Imagine beautifully structured temple with double the beauty due to reflections of the clear lake.


Paddy rice fields @ Ubud, Bali

Dolphin sightings at Lovina

One of the best place in the world to do dolphin sighting boat trip. You will leave the beach at dawn to seek for the dolphins, though yes it may be quite crowded with other tourists trying to do the same especially during peak season, it is still well worth it when you find a school of dolphins happily jumping by. Lovina itself have a number of other attractions and activities itself, and boasts itself some backpacker scene where you can chill out in cafes and with live musics.


Lady selling flowers at the Market @ Ubud, Bali


Yes despite that one might be trying to escape the eat, pray, love trail, Ubud is one place you cannot miss. It is still the heart of Bali, where all the action is and all the people and energy are focused on. Ubud is packed and condensed with the best of Bali, ranging from nature, culture and people, temples, museums, rolling rice/paddy fields and man-made gardens and parks. You may take a interesting bike tour around here or take up cooking, adventure activities like whitewater rafting and other outdoor activities, relax yourself with yoga and meditation or have some pampering of spas and massages and also enjoy arts and theatres and not to forget shopping. Just so you see Ubud have a little bit of everything for almost everyone.


Party @ Kuta Beach, Bali

Party at Kuta Beach

Kuta is the most popular beach in Bali, which means you can be sure to find the life and party scene here in Kuta Beach. Head here if you are looking out to socialize, party and have a good time. You be sure to find a range of places for different atmosphere and budget, ranging from Hard Rock cafe to your neighborhood cafe and pub.


Private Beach @ Nusa Dua, Bali

Private beach at Nusa Dua Beach

If you have a bit more of a budget to spare, splurge at Nusa Dua beach, where it is dotted with higher end hotels. You will be rewarded with private pristine beaches for you to slowly soak in the sun and the sea. Also ideal for honeymooners or people looking out for a private and relaxing getaway.


Hike Mount Batur @ Kintamani, Bali

Hike/Climb Mount Batur at Kintamani

Up in a highland in East of Bali, there lies Mount Batur caldera in Kintamani. A climb to the summit (1700 meters) of this active volcano is a great experience for any active travelers. Many would do the sunrise hike for an ultimate experience, starting from as early as 4am to reach in time for 6am sunrise. This hike is relatively easy and the treks are quite well marked. From the peak of the mountain, there are views in all direction to sweep you off your feet, not literally of course.


Bar on rocks @ Ayana, Bali

Ayana bar on rocks

We have two temples on the cliff, now we get to drink off the bar perched on yet another cliff at Ayana in Bali. This is known as the best bar in Bali, having a long line of people daily trying to get in and have a drink or two with some bites (which is surprisingly good) while overlooking the sea crashing into the rocks below. Think about drinking, chilling and also dancing atop a cliff with the roaring sea stretching behind you to infinity while you watch white water crashed onto the side of the wall creating a spectacular of natural show. If you decide where is one bar you must go to, Ayana bar on the rocks is the place.

Coffee plantation at Bali Pulina Agro Tourism



Coffee roasting @ Agro Plantation, Bali

An almost zen place for you to sit back and really appreciate your cup of coffee while overlooking the coffee plantation as far as the eye can see. Here you are served with various coffee and tea for tasting. You can also see the process of how the famous and expensive Kopi Luwak are made and even the civet cats themselves. If you are a coffee lover, do come check this place out for the ultimate coffee experience.

So you have it, ten reasons to visit Bali and these are just the highlights. Now you know the reason behind Bali’s popularity, so maybe people can just be right sometimes. Come over with an open heart and open arms, huge ounce of patience and tolerance for crowd, close an eye to all the touristy things glaring at you and just enjoy yourself here. If all else fail, you can always jump on the next available fast boat and escape to Gili Islands or Lombok!

Best regard
I putu agus juli antara

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Bali history #agus bali transport & tour service

Bali | History About Bali Island Of Gods

Bali, Bali | History About Bali Island Of Gods

Bali Island

Bali is a province of Indonesia which is located between the islands of Java and Lombok island, Bali is also commonly referred to as The Island Of Thousands Temples, The Island of Gods, Bali Dwipa, Bali also has several small islands are also included in the province of Bali, including the island of Nusa Penida, nusa Lembongan Island, Ceningan island, Serangan Island and Menjangan Island.

The capital of Bali is Denpasar, located in the south of the island, the island of Bali is renowned as a world tourism destination with unique art and culture. Bali island is a best place for holiday with the world class accommodations

ContensBali IslandBali HistoryBali GeographyBali Administrative DivisionsBali Map

Bali History

Bali was inhabited by around 2000 BC by Austronesian peoples who migrated originally from Taiwan through Maritime Southeast Asia. Culturally and linguistically, the Balinese are thus closely related to the peoples of the Indonesian archipelago, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Oceania. Stone tools dating from this time have been found near the village of Cekik in the island’s west. In ancient Bali, nine Hindu sects existed, namely Pasupata, Bhairawa, Siwa Shidanta, Waisnawa, Bodha, Brahma, Resi, Sora and Ganapatya. Each sect revered a specific deity as its personal Godhead. Balinese culture was strongly influenced by Indian, Chinese, and particularly Hindu culture, beginning around the 1st century AD. The name Bali dwipa (“Bali island”) has been discovered from various inscriptions, including the Blanjong pillar inscription written by Sri Kesari Warmadewa in 914 AD and mentioning “Walidwipa”. It was during this time that the complex irrigation system subak was developed to grow rice. Some religious and cultural traditions still in existence today can be traced back to this period. The Hindu Majapahit Empire (1293–1520 AD) on eastern Java founded a Balinese colony in 1343. When the empire declined, there was an exodus of intellectuals, artists, priests, and musicians from Java to Bali in the 15th century.


The first European contact with Bali is thought to have been made in 1585 when a Portuguese ship foundered off the Bukit Peninsula and left a few Portuguese in the service of Dewa Agung. In 1597 the Dutch explorer Cornelis de Houtman arrived at Bali and, with the establishment of the Dutch East India Company in 1602, the stage was set for colonial control two and a half centuries later when Dutch control expanded across the Indonesian archipelago throughout the second half of the nineteenth century (see Dutch East Indies). Dutch political and economic control over Bali began in the 1840s on the island’s north coast, when the Dutch pitted various distrustful Balinese realms against each other. In the late 1890s, struggles between Balinese kingdoms in the island’s south were exploited by the Dutch to increase their control.
The Dutch mounted large naval and ground assaults at the Sanur region in 1906 and were met by the thousands of members of the royal family and their followers who fought against the superior Dutch force in a suicidal puputan defensive assault rather than face the humiliation of surrender. Despite Dutch demands for surrender, an estimated 1,000 Balinese marched to their death against the invaders. In the Dutch intervention in Bali (1908), a similar massacre occurred in the face of a Dutch assault in Klungkung. Afterwards the Dutch governors were able to exercise administrative control over the island, but local control over religion and culture generally remained intact. Dutch rule over Bali came later and was never as well established as in other parts of Indonesia such as Java and Maluku.
In the 1930s, anthropologists Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson, and artists Miguel Covarrubias and Walter Spies, and musicologist Colin McPhee created a western image of Bali as “an enchanted land of aesthetes at peace with themselves and nature”, and western tourism first developed on the island.

Imperial Japan occupied Bali during World War II. Bali Island was not originally a target in their Netherlands East Indies Campaign, but as the airfields on Borneo were inoperative due to heavy rains the Imperial Japanese Army decided to occupy Bali, which did not suffer from comparable weather. The island had no regular Royal Netherlands East Indies Army (KNIL) troops. There was only a Native Auxiliary Corps Prajoda (Korps Prajoda) consisting of about 600 native soldiers and several Dutch KNIL officers under command of KNIL Lieutenant Colonel W.P. Roodenburg. On 19 February 1942 the Japanese forces landed near the town of Senoer. The island was quickly captured. During the Japanese occupation a Balinese military officer, Gusti Ngurah Rai, formed a Balinese ‘freedom army’. The lack of institutional changes from the time of Dutch rule however, and the harshness of war requisitions made Japanese rule little better than the Dutch one. Following Japan’s Pacific surrender in August 1945, the Dutch promptly returned to Indonesia, including Bali, immediately to reinstate their pre-war colonial administration. This was resisted by the Balinese rebels now using Japanese weapons. On 20 November 1946, the Battle of Marga was fought in Tabanan in central Bali. Colonel I Gusti Ngurah Rai, by then 29 years old, finally rallied his forces in east Bali at Marga Rana, where they made a suicide attack on the heavily armed Dutch. The Balinese battalion was entirely wiped out, breaking the last thread of Balinese military resistance. In 1946 the Dutch constituted Bali as one of the 13 administrative districts of the newly proclaimed State of East Indonesia, a rival state to the Republic of Indonesia which was proclaimed and headed by Sukarno and Hatta. Bali was included in the “Republic of the United States of Indonesia” when the Netherlands recognised Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Bali Geography

The island of Bali lies 3.2 km (2 mi) east of Java, and is approximately 8 degrees south of the equator. Bali and Java are separated by the Bali Strait. East to west, the island is approximately 153 km (95 mi) wide and spans approximately 112 km (69 mi) north to south; its land area is 5,632 km².
Bali’s central mountains include several peaks over 3,000 metres in elevation. The highest is Mount Agung (3,031 m), known as the “mother mountain” which is an active volcano. Mountains range from centre to the eastern side, with Mount Agung the easternmost peak. Bali’s volcanic nature has contributed to its exceptional fertility and its tall mountain ranges provide the high rainfall that supports the highly productive agriculture sector. South of the mountains is a broad, steadily descending area where most of Bali’s large rice crop is grown. The northern side of the mountains slopes more steeply to the sea and is the main coffee producing area of the island, along with rice, vegetables and cattle. The longest river, Ayung River, flows approximately 75 km.

The island is surrounded by coral reefs. Beaches in the south tend to have white sand while those in the north and west have black sand. Bali has no major waterways, although the Ho River is navigable by small sampan boats. Black sand beaches between Pasut and Klatingdukuh are being developed for tourism, but apart from the seaside temple of Tanah Lot, they are not yet used for significant tourism.

The largest city is the provincial capital, Denpasar, near the southern coast. Its population is around 491,500 (2002). Bali’s second-largest city is the old colonial capital, Singaraja, which is located on the north coast and is home to around 100,000 people. Other important cities include the beach resort, Kuta, which is practically part of Denpasar’s urban area, and Ubud, situated at the north of Denpasar, is the island’s cultural centre.

Three small islands lie to the immediate south east and all are administratively part of the Klungkung regency of Bali: Nusa Penida, Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Ceningan. These islands are separated from Bali by the Badung Strait.

To the east, the Lombok Strait separates Bali from Lombok and marks the biogeographical division between the fauna of the Indomalayan ecozone and the distinctly different fauna of Australasia. The transition is known as the Wallace Line, named after Alfred Russel Wallace, who first proposed a transition zone between these two major biomes. When sea levels dropped during the Pleistocene ice age, Bali was connected to Java and Sumatra and to the mainland of Asia and shared the Asian fauna, but the deep water of the Lombok Strait continued to keep Lombok and the Lesser Sunda archipelago isolated

Bali Administrative Divisions

The province is divided into 8 regencies (kabupaten) and 1 city (kota), These are:

NameCapitalArea in km²Jembrana RegencyNegara841.80Tabanan RegencyTabanan839.30Badung RegencyMangupura418.52Gianyar RegencyGianyar368.00Klungkung RegencySemarapura315.00Bangli RegencyBangli520.81Karangasem RegencyAmlapura839.54Buleleng RegencySingaraja1,365.88Denpasar CityDenpasar123.98Totals-5,780.06